Olive Egger™ Chicken

Hatching on February 3, 2021

Order now for estimated delivery by February 6, 2021.

(0 customer reviews)

As low as: $3.60

Olive Egger™ – Sold as Baby Chicks Only 
       Minimums – Not Sexed = 3 
                          Female = 3
                          Male = 1    
                                Total of 3 birds to ship       

Seasonal/Shipped March thru Sept

SKU: 140 Category: Tag:

Description

The Olive Egger™ is not a pure bred chicken breed and can be made from several crosses. Generally it is made from crossing a real dark brown egg shell layer with a real true blue egg shell layer. This will produce in the first generation some great olive colored eggs for your table. Our breeding is from pure Cream Legbar Rooster over our pure Welsummer to create a F1 Olive Egger™. Good layers of various colored eggs. First eggs maybe small but will get to medium to large size. You will love these Olive Egger™ chickens.

The olive egg will not be consistence in color and also from hen to hen that lays it. But all have the genes to produce a variety of shades of the olive color shell. 97% of these hens will lay a olive colored egg.

Check out our blog about Olive Egger™ Chickens  and How to Breed Olive Egger™ Chickens

Reviews

  1. Robyn

    Healthiest chicks we have received

    Overall fantastic experience with the Crackle team. They were very responsive to our inquiries. The chicks were received right on time and they sent a few extra just in case. The chicks are the healthiest we have bought — despite having bought directly from a store and on online before. We would definitely buy these again!

  2. Wendy in ID

    Beauty, charm, output!

    After twenty five years of chicken-keeping I’ve found my “heart hen” at last. In our small flocks I’ve raised all kinds of laying breeds, from various bantams to sex-links to a half dozen or so heritage types, and have to say our Olive Eggers are my hands-down favorite. I love my Cackle Hatchery OEs for their beauty, charm, independence, trusting nature, unique egg color and remarkable egg-to-hen size ratio. I’ve had my OEs for nearly a year. I ordered three females on special, and received four (thanks, Cackle!), including one roo.

    About the Roo: Doodledoo has grown into a gorgeous, feisty and very protective rooster. He tolerates my husband, who *never* handles his hens. With me, it’s another story. One day Doodledoo watched in horror and panic thru the plexiglass coop door as I did a routine mite-check and preventative dusting of his hens’ bottoms with diatomaceous earth. When a few of them—the barred rock, black star and Wyandotte—squawked an objection, that was IT: I was henceforth The Enemy, and Doodledoo began attacking me on sight. In the yard I was subject to ambush at any time. So I began packin’ “heat”: a spray bottle of water; a stick to tap his tail with; earnest threats of a trip to the processor… Nothing worked until I eventually tumbled on the advice of an experienced flock herd who said, “never let a mean roo bully you or he’ll keep doing it; if he tries to, hold him down.” Well, that maneuver did the trick! Wearing thick gloves I’d just grab a leg when he leapt, and then pin him down to the ground on his side for a minute or so (it may or may not have been a little hard for him to breathe during that minute). After a few days of this treatment Doodledoo came around. Now he just eyes me warily, but will cede ground and walk away if I give him a moment to think things thru. So Doodledoo can stay:) There. ‘Nuff said about my OE roo!

    My Olive Egger *hens* are the cutest, sweetest birds ever! Right from the start they’ve behaved…’differently.’ When I pick them up they relax in my arms and wait to see what will happen next. I can flip them gently this way and that to dust their bottoms, and they patiently, trustingly put up with it. They never seem to struggle or flap in a panic like other breeds. Out in the yard they are filled with curiosity and an ‘aware’ independence. They explore further, and seem to have their own agenda regardless of what the rest of the flock is doing. They are interested in what we’re up to tho, and if we’re inside they may hang around the door and just peer in the window after us. They are visibly more petite than our other birds but lay eggs just as big or bigger. Today a random olive egg and a Wyandotte egg found in the same nest box both weighed in at exactly 2-1/8 ounces. My OEs have the most beautiful, sleek plumage; I much prefer it to the frumpy, ruffled look of Ameraucanas, for example. The OEs are perhaps not as flashy as some breeds, but are dressed instead in protective coloration, which is a real asset considering their tendency to actively explore and forage. I love their remarkable, bright salmon breast color and how it blends to a subtle russet brown and then into dove grey wings as velvety smooth and tight as those of a wild cedar waxwing. They move so gracefully as they forage, too; their large, upright, dark grey tail turns and sways like a giant sail or rudder. Their feathered topknot and floppy red crest lends them a jaunty look that is so adorable it just melts my heart! So by now you can guess how I felt when tragedy struck a couple of weeks ago, and a security breech (due to human error) led to the loss of our barred rock and two of my three OE hens to a hungry raccoon. I. Was. Devastated. Doodledoo too! He called and grieved for days. As I type, I watch my remaining OE busily scratch and peck all by herself in the garden, while Doodledoo and his mixed flock roam elsewhere. It’s sad to know that for the moment we are left with only one source of beautiful green eggs to offset the various soft browns in our egg cartons.

    For two weeks I agonized over what to replace the lost hens with (and also how to augment our flock in this time of global pandemic). I wanted to research every possibility before settling on my choices. Perhaps unsurprisingly, I thought of getting both Welsummers and Cream legbars—the two parent breeds of my Cackle Hatchery OEs. But in the end I decided that only a new batch of OEs—along with some Welsummers for their dark brown eggs—will do. I’m sure the Cream Legbars are just as charming as my OEs, but somehow plain blue eggs just don’t do it for me. I much prefer the rich, earthy, varied olive tones of the OEs’ eggs. Plus, people I share my eggs with get such a kick out of telling their grandkids they’ll be eating green eggs! Just like those in the “Green Eggs and Ham” story by Dr. Seuss. If I had the room I’d get some of every breed on Cackle’s list. But given their beauty, charm, petite size and and remarkably big, green egg output, Cackle’s Olive Eggers are the clear winner with me.

  3. Alex

    Green Eggs

    All 4 of my olive egger girls laid gorgeous green eggs. One of them went broody and hatched out 15 babies! She wasn’t that big so I was quite impressed.

  4. Army Eggers

    Love!

    We bought ours because our son was deployed to Afghanistan and it was honoring him! They a Re beautiful and so friendly! We are incredibly grateful and buying again!

  5. Jess

    Just as described!

    We just love our Olive Eggers! Ordered three and was shipped four. All are healthy, super friendly and lay the most gorgeous shade of Olive eggs. Thanks, Cackle!

  6. Ashley

    Beautiful eggs

    My olive eggers just started laying! Just turned 4 months what a pretty olive color so excited. The small crests are the cutest. Last year I got your olive eggers mixed with welsummers and amerucanas they didn’t lay an olive egg one is blue and one tan speckled. I’m really like these legbar crosses. Next I’d love to see a maran as the dark layer.

  7. Pale

    Well just ordered 5 F.

    I just ordered 5 hens 2/1/19. Shopping was easy. I will review when chicks are received, and when they start laying. But so far 5 stars.

  8. Cindy

    Love My Olive Egger

    I absolutely love my girl! She recently started laying the most gorgeous olive eggs that become deeper in hue with each egg she lays. I wish I could share a picture. I’m definitely buying more this spring.

  9. Tia

    Olive egger lays peach egg

    My olive Eggers does NOT lay olive eggs. They look like a cream legbar with welsummer mixed colors but they are not a first generation olive egger, because they don’t lay Olive. Dissapointed 🙁

  10. Abby

    Olive Eggers

    I ordered 5 olive eggers this summer. Two of them started laying eggs. Both are laying cream colored eggs. I’m very disappointed as I really wanted olive colored shells. I’m absolutely in love with my girls, and I hope the other three lay the olive colored eggs. I’ll guess I’ll have to wait and see.

  11. Jackie-Cackle Hatchery

    Please call us!

    If your Olive Eggers are not laying green eggs, please contact us so we can work with you.and make it right.

  12. The Hen House

    Brown Eggs

    Beautiful chickens! BUT… our olive eggers lay light brown eggs, not olive green.

  13. mejane

    Love these OE’s

    We received our OE’s in the spring with a mix of other chickens. We ordered pullets. They sent 3 extra chicks. Out of 15 ordered and 3 extra, we only ended up with one Rooster. I didn’t want a rooster but he is beautiful and so far not aggressive towards humans. The hens started laying beautiful olive eggs about a month ago. Very pleased. Will order from Cackle again.

  14. Melzie

    Cream Legbar?

    We have had 2 sets of these olive eggers. On other sites the pictures above show as Cream Legbars. Hoping they lay green eggs and not blue. We kept two from the bunch and they are sweet and quiet.

  15. Alabama Chick

    Super chicks!

    Love these chipmunk-striped chicks. One week after receiving, all are doing great. So glad I ordered them!

  16. Smoeller

    Oliver Egger Chicks

    Received 3 OE chicks last week and they are doing great! They are healthy, friendly, and a beautiful chipmunk pattern. Can’t wait to see them as adults!

  17. Katsandhu

    Olive eggers

    Just got my chicks and there healthy and once they got their Electrolite water with probiotics, they are peeping up a storm. Quite pretty black to chipmunk striped.

  18. Colorado

    Great arrival

    Received 3 olive eggerror chicks last week. Big chicls,very healthy. I love forward to see what color of eggs they will lay.

  19. The Craigs

    Healthy chicks!

    Just picked up three olive egger chicks – healthy and active and we are very excited to see you offer this breed option! It would be great to know if these are F1, F2 or F3 generation chicks for breeding purposes – thanks again!

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Breed Facts

  • Poultry Show Class: Miscellaneous Class
  • Weights: Hen ——-5 1/2 lbs          Rooster—-6 1/2 lb
    Pullet——4 1/2 lbs       Cockerel—5 1/2 lbs
  • Purpose and Type: Egg laying and ornamental; Production
  • Egg Shell Color: Olive green
  • Egg Production: 180-200 eggs per year (estimates only, see FAQ)
  • Egg Size: Medium-Large
  • Temperament: Active
  • Gender Accuracy: 80-85%
  • Fertility Percentage: 55-70%
  • Broody: Non Setter
  • Mating Ratio:  10 Females to 1 Male
  • Roost Height: 4+ feet
  • Country of Origin: United States
  • APA: No
  • ALBC: Not Listed
  • Breeder Farm Source: Cackle Hatchery® Poultry Breeding Farm has been developing our bloodline/strain of production type Olive Egger since 2015.

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Ship DateAvailable
02-03-2021 Available
02-10-2021 Available
02-17-2021 Available
02-22-2021 Available
02-24-2021 Available
03-01-2021 Available
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