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Black Australorp Chickens in the Heritage Breed Spotlight

Black Australorp Hens pecking about in a yard

Black Australorp chickens were developed in Australia by crossing black Orpingtons from England with other breeds that are good egg layers. The idea was to develop farmstead chickens that excel in egg production. The breed name comes from combining the words Australia and Orpington. Physical Attributes The United States favors Australorps that are black, although […]

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Heritage Breed Spotlight: White Pekin Duck

Two white Pekin Ducks

The White Pekin is the quintessential duck that most people think of when they hear the word “duck.” This big white duck derives from an ancient Chinese breed, the name of which translates as “ten-pound duck.” The first Pekins in the United States arrived in the early 1870s, hatched in the Chinese city of Peking, […]

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Heritage Breed Spotlight: Welsh Harlequin Duck

Welsh Harlequin ducks swimming in a pond

The Welsh Harlequin duck was developed in Wales in 1949 from a pair of light colored sports hatched from Khaki Campbell ducks. The breed was first imported to the United States in 1968 and admitted to the American Standard of Perfection in 2001. Physical Attributes Welsh Harlequins are slightly heavier than Khaki Campbells, but similar […]

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Heritage Breed Spotlight: Fawn & White Runner Duck

A group of Fawn and White Runner Ducks

The Runner duck is an ancient breed known in the East Indies for at least 2,000 years. Its excellence lies in being a terrific layer that’s agile enough to easily herd over long distances. Runner ducks were traditionally kept in pens overnight. After the hens laid their eggs in the morning, the ducks were herded […]

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Heritage Breed Spotlight: Rouen Duck

A foursome of Rouen ducks walk together in an outdoor space

The Rouen duck originates from France, where farmers have raised the breed for hundreds of years. Rouens arrived in the United States in 1850 and were admitted to the American Standard of Perfection in 1874. Physical Attributes Rouens look like Mallards, only they are considerably larger. And they don’t fly nearly as well, making them […]

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