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Orpington Chickens in the Heritage Breed Spotlight

An Orpington chicken with a chick

Orpington chickens get their name from the town of Orpington in Kent, England. They are the creation of Britain’s William Cook, whose goal was developing an outstanding meat and egg breed that tolerates England’s cold winters. Orpingtons first appeared at exhibition in London in 1886 and were first shown in the United States in 1895. […]

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Wyandotte Chickens in the Heritage Breed Spotlight

A Wyandotte-Buff-Roo chicken inside a coop

Wyandotte chickens were developed in a region of the United States once occupied by the Native American Huron tribes. Collectively, these tribes were known as Wendat, or Wyandot, which inspired the breed name. Physical Attributes With their short tail, short back, and loose feathering, Wyandotte chickens look rather round. They may be large or bantam. […]

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Swedish Duck in the Heritage Breed Spotlight

Blue Swedish Duck sits on a pond

The Swedish duck has its origins in the early to mid 1800s in Pomerania, a region on the Baltic Sea that was once controlled by Sweden. The breed first came to the United States in 1884. The only variety listed in the American Standard of Perfection is the blue variety, accepted in 1904. Physical Attributes […]

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Ancona Duck in the Rare Breed Spotlight

A group of Ancona Ducks

The Ancona duck originated in the 1910s, yet remains a rare breed that has never been listed in the American Standard of Perfection. Cackle Hatchery® is one of its few long-term breeders, having maintained Ancona genetics since 1977. Physical Attributes Anconas are typically white and black, or any combination of white and color, in irregular […]

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Heritage Breed Spotlight: Khaki Campbell Duck

Three Khaki Campbell ducks sit on a backyard pool

The Khaki Campbell duck came about when Adele Campbell of Gloucestershire, England, wanted a dual-purpose duck that laid well, but with a good-size body for roasting. The resulting duck breed first appeared in the late 1800s. The ducks’ buff-color plumage reminded Ms. Campbell of army uniforms, hence the name Khaki Campbell. Introduced to the United […]

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