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How to Store Eggs in Water Glass

eggs in a basket

Before refrigeration became commonplace, submerging eggs in water glass was the preferred method of storage. Water glass, also known as sodium silicate, is a glassy solid (silicon dioxide) that dissolves in water. It has numerous industrial uses, including as a food preservative and a desiccant (silica gel pack) to protect delicate items from absorbing moisture. […]

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4 Functions of a Chicken Egg’s Bloom

brown eggs in nest

The final step of an egg’s formation inside a hen is the application of an invisible coating. We chicken keepers call it bloom, but technically it’s the cuticle. Bloom consists primarily of 80 to 95% proteins. It also contains polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates that dissolve into simple sugars) and lipids (insoluble oily or greasy compounds). Lubrication […]

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The Lethal Creeper Gene in Japanese Bantams

japanese bantams

Japanese bantams bred for exhibition must have short legs, according to the Standard of Perfection. Unfortunately this trait comes with a dominant lethal gene called creeper (Cp). The creeper gene causes embryos to die during incubation, resulting in a reduced hatch rate for Japanese bantam eggs. Here’s how the lethal creeper gene works: Creeper Genetics […]

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Coccidiosis — the Scourge of Chicks and Poults

Coccidiosis is the most common disease of brooded poultry. It affects primarily chicks and poults (baby turkeys). But it may also (though rarely) affect keets (baby guinea fowl), ducklings, and goslings. It is the most common cause of death in young poultry. What Is Coccidiosis? Coccidiosis is an intestinal disease caused by protozoa. It most […]

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3 Ways to Brood Guinea Fowl and 1 Way Not To

guinea fowl hen with keets

Guinea fowl are fiercely protective parents. Unfortunately they don’t seem to grasp the concept that their little ones can’t move as fast as the big guys. As a result, the keets easily get lost. Further, during their first two weeks of life baby guineas, or keets, chill easily. Trapsing through dew-wet grass while trying to […]

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Medicinal Herbs for Chickens

picture of basil

Medicinal herbs for chickens have a variety of desirable properties. Benefits include healthful nutrients that are lacking in pharmacological drugs. Herbs also have the ability to interact with drugs to reduce required dosages. And, unlike antibiotics, the active components of herbal compounds readily absorb, along with other digestive contents. They are rapidly excreted, too, with […]

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Repellent Herbs for Chickens

nasturtium

Few scientific studies have verified the use of herbs as insecticides or insect repellents. However, using herbs in the chicken coop won’t harm your chickens. And using repellent herbs for chickens just might discourage some of the external parasites that plague them. Repellent Herbs You might, for example, sprinkle herbs, fresh or dried, on bedding […]

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Sour Crop in Chickens and Turkeys

Sour crop in chickens and turkeys is caused by yeast of the Candida species. The condition, also known as thrush, is technically called candida infection or candidiasis. Left untreated, sour crop can have dire consequences. Signs of Sour Crop Sour crop typically affects either young and growing or aging and elderly birds, but may occur […]

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